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From tigers to contented cats

Posted by on Feb 17, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

From tigers to contented cats

At the beginning of this month there was a brief and moderate amount of publicity in the UK for two books about a subject many of us, myself included, find difficult to contemplate – death. One was by an Australian palliative care nurse called Bonnie Ware, who wrote ‘The Top Five Regrets About Dying’. Ware observed many people nearing death who saw with complete clarity that, for example, they wished they had the courage to live a life that was true to themselves and not the one that others’ expected of them. The next bigge st regret...

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Modern versions of a sabre-toothed tiger

Posted by on Feb 8, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Modern versions of a sabre-toothed tiger

Modern versions of a sabre-toothed tiger In the last blog: Our old-fashioned stress response, we discussed how our stress alerts can keep us in constant state of alert disproportionate to the situations we find ourselves in. This can lead to problems with our health and well-being. This time we are sharing a story taken from Anger Kills by Redford and Virginia Williams page 25. This is a very useful book on hostility—one of Redford Williams main subjects of research. The story charts what happens in a person’s body when they suffer irritation...

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Our old-fashioned stress response

Posted by on Jan 31, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Our old-fashioned stress response

Fight or flight When we lived as hunter-gatherers in small tribes life was hard and much shorter than the average time we can hope to live for now. Tribes worked together to collect food, protect their young and defend their territory. From time to time a member of the tribe might face a life-threatening situation—like being chased by a sabre-toothed tiger. In order to meet the challenges of such an event their fight-or-flight mechanism would kick in preparing their body to stand and fight, or to run for their lives. We have just the same...

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Hard Wired to Connect

Posted by on Jan 23, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Hard Wired to Connect

One of the aims of this blog is to share different voices and their experience of applying mindfulness, meditation and compassion in the workplace. This week I am very happy to introduce a blog from my friend and colleague Darran Trute. I hope you enjoy reading! The training offered by Awareness in Action, provides the vision and ability to apply the techniques of mindfulness, meditation and compassion into our working life.  As well as feeling the immediate helpful benefits of such techniques myself, which is my own direct measure, I also...

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Four ways to stop work getting on top of you

Posted by on Jan 12, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Four ways to stop work getting on top of you

Well-being for people at work is an important element of any Awareness in Action workshop. We go into the whole issue pretty thoroughly but to get people started we introduce these four simple ways of taking better care of themselves. 1.Changing your routine Routines can help us accomplish tasks quickly and efficiently but if we hang on to them too tightly they can also be a way of getting ourselves into a rut and closing down possibilities. Neuroscience is helping us understand a great deal about our brains—particularly the discovery of...

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Being able to imagine yourself in the other person’s wheelchair

Posted by on Jan 4, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Being able to imagine yourself in the other person’s wheelchair

In the last couple of months, trouble with first one knee and then the other necessitated a period of needing airport assistance when I fly. It’s a delicate situation where it is possible to feel quite vulnerable, even exposed and it has been a real discovery to meet the people whose job it is to deliver this kind of support. Basically, you get put into a wheelchair, or on to a buggy and are zipped through passport control and security at top speed with minimum inconvenience—unless you feel being delivered like a package to your plane count...

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Merry Christmas and an auspicious New Year!

Posted by on Dec 20, 2011 in Blog | 0 comments

Merry Christmas and an auspicious New Year!

Thank for supporting the launch and early weeks of the Awareness in Action BLOG. It has been great to receive so many comments and so much support. In the new year we’ll be absorbing some of the feedback you’ve shared and making some changes to the presentation of the BLOG. Have a wonderful holiday period and look forward to blogging with you in...

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Meeting Madness

Posted by on Dec 12, 2011 in Blog | 0 comments

Meeting Madness

We all know that meetings can be a challenge in so many different ways from trying to get a project idea approved, to simply surviving the boredom but they can also be an opportunity to apply some techniques of mindfulness, empathy and kindness. Getting started Some of the groups we work with in Awareness in Action have made it a habit to begin a meeting with a few moments of silence to help people arrive and settle but this is not always something you can make happen. However, you can take a moment yourself while other people are settling...

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Finding someone difficult at work? Try smiling at them!

Posted by on Nov 23, 2011 in Blog | 0 comments

Finding someone difficult at work? Try smiling at them!

[tube]P-cJdQ6swWo[/tube] There are friends of mine who would make a big deal out of saying how yucky the idea is of walking around with a big photo of your smile and showing it to people but I would challenge them to watch this video and not feel moved by the responses that the artist Claire Lemmel inspires with her photo. It brought home to me how easy it is to forget to smile when we get absorbed at work. There’s always so much to do in such short amount of time, as well as worrying about all the things to be done once we get out of work...

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My mood can become your problem

Posted by on Nov 15, 2011 in Blog | 0 comments

My mood can become your problem

Recently I was doing a piece of work in a rural area of the south of France—very pleasant in some ways but in terms of communication and internet, frequently frustrating. After two interminable days of not even being able to use a dial-up system to retrieve email I turned, in some desperation, to an acquaintance who runs a small IT unit in the area, and who had helped me out before. Over the phone, as I explained my situation and asked for advice on how to get on even a slow-line, I could sense his reluctance and eventually impatience with my...

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